GardenShare

GardenShare

Thursday, November 20, 2014

SNAP "CHURN"



A new study examines SNAP “churn,” which occurs when a SNAP family exits the program and then reenters within four months or less. Churn is a policy concern for several reasons: the forgone benefits among households who were eligible while off the program, the client time and expense involved in reentering the program, and the added federal and State administrative costs associated with case closings and re-openings. Across six study states, the estimated rate of churn in 2011 ranged from 17 to 28%. Most participants exit at the time of a scheduled recertification or a required interim report and are off SNAP for a month or less. The research shows that changes in address, earnings or employment status, or household size or composition and issues of language, literacy, age, and disability all contribute to churn.

Source: Urban Institute, 11/7/14, SNAP Churn
 
 
I suspect that, in places like St. Lawrence County, transportation, or more specifically, the lack of transportation, contributes to people losing their SNAP benefits because they can't make it to appointments.
 
Gloria