GardenShare

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Monday, April 24, 2017

Economic inequality as a cause of hunger



Chronic hunger persists across the U.S. The number of food insecure Americans has risen—from 10% in 2002 to 13%.  While anti-hunger leaders have been effective at maintaining funding for SNAP and increasing the number of food banks, and federal food programs have remained intact while other anti-poverty programs have been eliminated or slashed, Andy Fisher argues that anti-hunger advocates are missing an essential point: That hunger is not an isolated problem, but the product of much larger economic inequality driven by low wages. Fisher is the author of a new book,  Big Hunger: The Unholy Alliance between Corporate America and Anti-Hunger Groups, which contends that because anti-hunger organizations are heavily reliant on corporate donations of food and money, they have often failed to hold businesses accountable for offshoring jobs, cutting benefits, exploiting workers and rural communities, and resisting wage increases.

Source: Civil Eats, 4/20/17, Solve Poverty